inveterate


inveterate
inveterate, confirmed, chronic, deep-seated, deep-rooted are comparable when meaning so firmly established or settled that change is almost impossible.
Inveterate applies especially to something which has persisted so long and so obstinately that it has become a fixed habit or an almost inalterable custom or tradition
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the growing infirmities of age manifest themselves in nothing more strongly than in an inveterate dislike of interruption— Lamb

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Supported by precedent so inveterate that the chance of abandonment is small— Cardozo

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When applied to a person, the term implies the formation of a seemingly ineradicable habit, attitude, or way of acting or behaving
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an inveterate smoker

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an inveterate and formidable foePeacock

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Confirmed applies chiefly to something which has grown stronger or firmer with time until it resists all attack or assault or attempts to uproot it
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a confirmed belief in God

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a confirmed hatred of a person

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not so easy to say that a confirmed anti-American mood has settled on the British people— Barbara Ward

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Like inveterate, it may also apply to a person who is such as he is described in the noun by the strengthening or crystallization of a taste, a vice or virtue, or an attitude
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a confirmed bachelor

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a confirmed invalid

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confirmed do-gooders always end by doing good by coercion— Mortimer Smith

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Chronic also implies long duration, but it applies either to diseases, habits, or conditions which persist without marked interruption in spite of attempts to alleviate or to cure them or to the persons who are afflicted or affected by such diseases, habits, or conditions
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his chronic state of mental restlessness— George Eliot

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chronic bron- chitis

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hysterical with failure and repeated disappointment and chronic poverty— Huxley

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the working scientist . . . must steer a middle course between chronic indecision and precipitant judgment— Eddington

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a chronic faultfinder

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Deep-seated and deep-rooted in their extended senses emphasize rather the extent to which something has entered into the structure or texture of the thing (as a person's body or mind or a people's nature) in which it becomes fixed or embedded
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the old, dependent, chaotic, haphazard pioneer instinct of his childhood [was] so deep-seated, that ... he slipped back into the boy he had been before— Brooks

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a deep-rooted reverence for truth— John Morley

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Wagner's bond with this woman was much stronger, more deep-rooted and lasting than one had thought— Heller

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Analogous words: habituated, accustomed, addicted (see HABITUATE): habitual, customary, *usual: *hardened, indurated: settled, set, fixed, established (see SET): inbred, innate: persisting or persistent, enduring, abiding (see corresponding verbs at CONTINUE)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Inveterate — In*vet er*ate, a. [L. inveteratus, p. p. of inveterare to render old; pref. in in + vetus, veteris, old. See {Veteran}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Old; long established. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] It is an inveterate and received opinion. Bacon. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • inveterate — ► ADJECTIVE 1) having a long standing and firmly established habit or activity: an inveterate gambler. 2) (of a feeling or habit) firmly established. DERIVATIVES inveteracy noun inveterately adverb. ORIGIN Latin inveteratus made old …   English terms dictionary

  • Inveterate — In*vet er*ate, v. t. To fix and settle by long continuance. [Obs.] Bacon. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • inveterate — I adjective accustomed, addicted, chronic, chronical, confirmed, customary, deep rooted, entrenched, established, firmly established, fixed, frequent, habitual, habituated, hardened, ingrained, inured, inveteratus, longstanding, penitus defixus,… …   Law dictionary

  • inveterate — (adj.) late 14c., from L. inveteratus of long standing, chronic, pp. of inveterare become old in, from in in, into (see IN (Cf. in ) (2)) + veterare to make old, from vetus (gen. veteris) old (see VETERAN (Cf …   Etymology dictionary

  • inveterate — [adj] long standing, established abiding, accustomed, addicted, chronic, confirmed, continuing, customary, deep rooted, deep seated, dyed in the wool*, enduring, entrenched, fixed, habitual, habituated, hardcore*, hardened, inbred, incorrigible,… …   New thesaurus

  • inveterate — [in vet′ər it] adj. [L inveteratus, pp. of inveterare, to make or become old < in , in + vetus, old: see VETERAN] 1. firmly established over a long period; of long standing; deep rooted 2. settled in a habit, practice, prejudice, etc.;… …   English World dictionary

  • inveterate — adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin inveteratus, from past participle of inveterare to age (v.t.), from in + veter , vetus old more at wether Date: 14th century 1. firmly established by long persistence < the inveterate tendency to… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • inveterate — adjective /ɪnˈvɛ.tɚ.ɪt/ a) Old; firmly established by long continuance; of long standing; obstinately deep rooted; as, an inveterate disease; an inveterate habit. a Heavens radiance of justice, prophetic, clearly of Heaven, discernible behind all …   Wiktionary

  • inveterate — [[t]ɪnve̱tərət[/t]] ADJ: ADJ n If you describe someone as, for example, an inveterate liar or smoker, you mean that they have lied or smoked for a long time and are not likely to stop doing it. Anderson has a reputation as an inveterate gambler …   English dictionary


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